STP794: A Comparison of Short Transverse Tension Test Methods

    Reed, DN
    Test Laboratory Supervisor, Metallurgical Engineer, R&D Division Process Engineer, and Product R&D Supervisor, Lukens Steel Company, Coatesville, Pa.

    Smith, RP
    Test Laboratory Supervisor, Metallurgical Engineer, R&D Division Process Engineer, and Product R&D Supervisor, Lukens Steel Company, Coatesville, Pa.

    Strattan, JK
    Test Laboratory Supervisor, Metallurgical Engineer, R&D Division Process Engineer, and Product R&D Supervisor, Lukens Steel Company, Coatesville, Pa.

    Swift, RA
    Test Laboratory Supervisor, Metallurgical Engineer, R&D Division Process Engineer, and Product R&D Supervisor, Lukens Steel Company, Coatesville, Pa.

    Pages: 15    Published: Jan 1983


    Abstract

    There are several methods presently being used to measure the short transverse tensile properties of light gage (<50 mm) steel plate. The methods can be divided into two categories: miniature specimens machined from the plate and short transverse specimens with welded prolongations. Both test methods give reliable information about the material. Recently, however, the use of the miniature specimen has been questioned because the surfaces of the plates are not tested. Since one purpose of the short transverse test is to assess susceptibility to lamellar tearing, this is a valid criticism. On the other hand, the welded prolongations, while testing the plate from surface to surface, have fusion zones and heat-affected zones present that may affect the testing of the plate surfaces. Proponents of both test methods argue the benefits of each test and are convinced theirs is the more accurate.

    This study presents comparisons of both test methods. The results show the advantages of each method as well as its limitations. The miniature specimen is ideally suited for light gage plates since the button ends are only 3 mm thick. The disruption in microstructure due to welding can be greater than 3 mm, thereby affecting test results, and these specimens are better suited for short transverse tests.

    Another advantage of the miniature specimen is the ability to test specific regions of a plate such as surface, quarterline, or centerline, through positioning of the specimen. Data show the value of this approach, particularly when highly stressed weld joints are to be made on the surface of plates.

    It is concluded that the miniature specimen provides valuable test data unobtainable from the welded specimen. Generally, both tests give comparable results. There are optimum gage ranges for each type of specimen.

    Keywords:

    lamellar tearing, miniature button head tension specimen, short transverse testing, stud-welded tension specimen, tension test, through gage


    Paper ID: STP10004S

    Committee/Subcommittee: A01.11

    DOI: 10.1520/STP10004S


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