MONO6

    Chapter 7-Cell-Based Approaches for Bone Graft Substitutes

    Published: Jan 2003

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    Abstract

    THE PROCESS OF BONE HEALING is an exquisite and complex phenomenon that requires the interaction of three key ingredients: 1) competent bone-forming cells, 2) a suitable framework or scaffold, and 3) the presence of biological stimulants. The principal actors in the process of bone formation are the bone-forming cells, the osteoblasts, and their precursors, the mesenchymal stem cells (MSC). Bone formation is the direct result of the self-assembly and mineralization of the extracellular matrix (ECM) produced by the osteoblasts. The osteoblast arises from the MSC and progresses through a series of maturation steps, eventually becoming an osteoblast. In this process, the cell stages of the maturation sequence are known by distinct names. The term osteoprogenitor is commonly used to refer to all the cell stages preceding the osteoblast, including the MSC.


    Author Information:

    Attawia, M

    Rosier, R

    Attawia, M
    DePuy AcroMed, Inc., a Johnson & Johnson Company, Raynham, MA

    Drexel University, Philadelphia, PA

    Kadiyala, S
    DePuy AcroMed, Inc., a Johnson & Johnson Company, Raynham, MA

    Fitzgerald, K
    DePuy AcroMed, Inc., a Johnson & Johnson Company, Raynham, MA

    Kraus, K
    Orthopedic Research Laboratory, Tufts University, School of Veterinary Medicine, North Grafton, MA

    Bruder, SP
    DePuy AcroMed, Inc., a Johnson & Johnson Company, Raynham, MA

    Skeletal Research Center, Case Western Reserve University, Cleveland, OH


    Paper ID: MONO10064M

    Committee/Subcommittee: F04.43

    DOI: 10.1520/MONO10064M


    CrossRef ASTM International is a member of CrossRef.

    ISBN10: 0-8031-3356-1
    ISBN13: 978-0-8031-3356-3