MNL46

    Static Hardness Testing Procedures

    Published: Jan 2007

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    Abstract

    THE FIRST STATIC HARDNESS TESTING METHOD WAS INTRODUCED BY J. A. Brinell, a Swedish researcher, at the 1900 Paris World Exposition. A hardened steel ball or tungsten carbide ball with a diameter (D) of 1, 2, 2.5, 5, or 10 mm was used as indenter. This was pressed into the smooth, clean specimen surface with a test force (F). Figure 21.1 shows the principle of test with test force F (N), D the diameter of the ball (mm), d the mean diameter of the indentation (mm), and h the depth of the indentation (mm). It is important that the specimen rests on a rigid support, and that the indenter contacts the specimen without being shaken or jolted. The test force is then increased to the predetermined maximum value within 2-10 s and held for 10-15 s. If the duration of load application falls outside of this range, this must be indicated. For example, for nonferrous materials, the duration may be as long as 180 s.

    Keywords:

    Metallography, Materialography, Preparation methods, Sample preparation, Mechanical polishing, Electrolytic polishing, Cutting, Sectioning, Hot mounting, Cold mounting, Grinding, Polishing, Polishing artifact, Etching, Microscope, Quantitative metallography, Stereology, Vickers hardness, Quality control, Microstructure


    Paper ID: MNL11201M

    Committee/Subcommittee: E04.05

    DOI: 10.1520/MNL11201M


    CrossRef ASTM International is a member of CrossRef.

    ISBN10: 0-8031-4265-X
    ISBN13: 978-0-8031-4265-7