MNL47: Chapter 3-Remediation Techniques

    Chesneau, HL
    President, Fuel Quality Services, Inc., GA

    Pages: 8    Published: Jan 2003


    Abstract

    THE TERM FUEL SYSTEM REMEDIATION describes the various processes used to return contaminated fuel and fuel systems to an acceptable condition. This chapter provides guidance on the basic processes for decontaminating fuels and fuel systems. Contaminants included in this discussion are water, organic and inorganic particulates, sludge slime, and biomass. After completing this chapter, readers should have a general understanding of each of the remediation processes; fuel polishing, tank cleaning, disposal, and chemical treatment. Fuel polishing involves filtration processes to clean the fuel. Physical tank cleaning is the best way to ensure that a system has been cleaned thoroughly. Tank cleaning is most effective when combined with fuel polishing. Typically, preventive measures are more cost effective than corrective measures. This chapter concludes with recommendations for reducing the rate of contaminant accumulation. ‘Fuel polishing’ is designed to remove water and particulates from fuel in order to reduce water and sediment loads below applicable product specification criteria such as ASTM fuel specifications. Where sludge and sediment have accumulated on tank bottoms, slime has built up on tank shell surfaces, or a combination of both phenomena has occurred, fuel polishing is insufficient. Tanks thus contaminated need to be cleaned. Microbicide treatment may be needed to disrupt and kill biofilm populations (see Chapter 1).


    Paper ID: MNL10445M

    Committee/Subcommittee: D02.02

    DOI: 10.1520/MNL10445M


    CrossRef ASTM International is a member of CrossRef.

    ISBN10: 0-8031-3357-X
    ISBN13: 978-0-8031-3357-0