Volume 2, Issue 10 (November 2005)

    Use of Herbicides to Control the Spread of Aquatic Invasive Plants

    (Received 7 April 2005; accepted 23 May 2005)

    Published Online: 2005

    CODEN: JAIOAD

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    Abstract

    Invasive aquatic plants have become problematic in lakes and reservoirs across the United States. Infestations should be aggressively controlled to prevent degradation of water quality, fish and wildlife habitat, and the reduction of biodiversity. Operating under the purview of the US Army Corps of Engineers Aquatic Plant Control Research Program, the Chemical Control and Physiological Processes Team (CCPPT) develops and evaluates environmentally sound strategies for managing invasive aquatic and wetland plants using herbicides. Evaluations are conducted using a multi-tiered approach in customized controlled-environmental chambers, greenhouses, outdoor mesocosms, and pond facilities. The CCPPT employs methods consistent with the herbicide modes of action when conducting herbicide efficacy studies in small-scale experimental systems. Results from these studies are verified in aquatic and wetland field sites throughout the US. Coordination with the US Environmental Protection Agency and state regulatory agencies is undertaken to support the review and registration of new aquatic herbicides and amendments to established labels. Information and technology developed via research efforts are transferred to natural resource managers, the private sector, and the general public.


    Author Information:

    Poovey, AG
    Research Biologist, US Army Engineer Research and Development Center, Vicksburg, MS

    Getsinger, KD
    Research Biologist, US Army Engineer Research and Development Center, Vicksburg, MS


    Stock #: JAI13254

    ISSN: 1546-962X

    DOI: 10.1520/JAI13254

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    Author
    Title Use of Herbicides to Control the Spread of Aquatic Invasive Plants
    Symposium Invasive Species: Their Ecological Impacts and Alternatives for Control, 2005-04-20
    Committee E47