An Approach to Understanding Flow Friction Ignition: A Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) Study on Temperature Development of High-Pressure Oxygen Flow Inside Micron-Scale Seal Cracks

    Volume 6, Issue 10 (November 2009)

    ISSN: 1546-962X

    CODEN: JAIOAD

    Published Online: 11 September 2009

    Page Count: 15


    Hooser, Jared D.
    MSME, Wendell Hull and Associates, Inc., Las Cruces, NM

    Wei, Mingjun
    Assistant Professor, Dept. of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering, New Mexico State Univ., Las Cruces, NM

    Newton, Barry E.
    VP R&D, Wendell Hull and Associates, Inc., Las Cruces, NM

    Chiffoleau, Gwenael J. A.
    Senior Scientist, Test Facility Manager, Wendell Hull & Associates, Inc., Las Cruces, NM

    (Received 29 December 2008; accepted 18 August 2009)

    Abstract

    Flow friction ignition of non-metallic materials in oxygen is a poorly understood heat-generating mechanism thought to be caused by oxygen flow past a non-metallic sealing surface. Micron-scale fatigue cracks or channels were observed on non-metallic sealing surfaces of oxygen components and could provide a leak path for the high-pressure oxygen to flow across the seal. Literature in the field of micro-fluidics research has noted that viscous dissipation, a heat-generating mechanism, may not be negligible as the flow dimension of the channel is reduced to the micron-scale. Results of a computational fluid dynamics study are presented and used to determine if temperatures developed in high-pressure driven micro-channel oxygen flows are capable of reaching the reported autogenous ignition temperature of non-metallic materials in oxygen.


    Paper ID: JAI102298

    DOI: 10.1520/JAI102298

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    Author
    Title An Approach to Understanding Flow Friction Ignition: A Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) Study on Temperature Development of High-Pressure Oxygen Flow Inside Micron-Scale Seal Cracks
    Symposium Twelfth International Symposium on Flammability and Sensitivity of Materials in Oxygen-Enriched Atmospheres, 2009-10-09
    Committee G04