Volume 50, Issue 2 (March 2005)

    Drug and Alcohol Use as Determinants of New York City Homicide Trends From 1990 to 1998

    (Received 16 July 2004; accepted 16 October 2004)

    Published Online: January

    CODEN: JFSOAD

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    Abstract

    In this population-level study, we analyzed how well changes in drug and alcohol use among homicide victims explained declining homicide rates in New York City between 1990 and 1998. Victim demographics, cause of death, and toxicology were obtained for all homicide (N = 12573) and accidental death victims (N = 6351) between 1990 and 1998 from the Office of the Chief Medical Examiner of New York (OCME). The proportion of homicide and accident decedents positive for cocaine fell between 1990 and 1998 (13% and 9% respectively); the proportion of homicide and accident decedents positive for opiates and/or alcohol did not change significantly. Changing patterns of drug and alcohol use by homicide victims were comparable to changing patterns of drug and alcohol use in accident victims, suggesting that changes in drug and alcohol use among homicide victims between 1990 and 1998 cannot solely explain the decline in NYC homicide rates.


    Author Information:

    Tardiff, AKJ
    Weill Medical College of Cornell University, New York, NY

    Vlahov, D

    Tracy, M
    Center for Urban Epidemiologic Studies, New York Academy of Medicine, New York, NY

    Galea, S

    Piper, TM
    Center for Urban Epidemiologic Studies, New York Academy of Medicine, New York, NY

    Wallace, Z
    Center for Urban Epidemiologic Studies, New York Academy of Medicine, New York, NY


    Stock #: JFS2004287

    ISSN: 0022-1198

    DOI: 10.1520/JFS2004287

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    Title Drug and Alcohol Use as Determinants of New York City Homicide Trends From 1990 to 1998
    Symposium , 0000-00-00
    Committee E30