Volume 48, Issue 5 (September 2003)

    A Potential Metallographic Technique for the Investigation of Pipe Bombings

    (Received 15 March 2003; accepted 15 March 2003)

    Published Online: September

    CODEN: JFSOAD

      Format Pages Price  
    PDF Version 16 $25   ADD TO CART


    Abstract

    This study was conducted in an attempt to develop a metallographic method for the investigation of pipe bombings. Three common pipe materials, ASTM A53 steel, AISI 304L stainless steel, and 6061-T6 aluminum, were shock-loaded using five high explosives and three propellants. The explosives used were ANFO, Composition C4, C6 detasheet, nitroglycerine-based dynamite, and flake TNT. The propellants used were FFFFg black powder, Red Dot smokeless powder, and Turbo Fuel A.

    The post-blast microstructure, hardness, and, in the case of 304L, transformed martensite content were examined for each test. The damage done to the microstructure was found to increase with increasing detonation velocity of the explosives and increase in pressure generated by the shockmetal interaction. Material hardness and, in the case of 304L, martensite content showed a sharp increase followed by a plateau as the shock pressure and detonation velocity increased.


    Stock #: JFS2002212

    ISSN: 0022-1198

    DOI: 10.1520/JFS2002212

    ASTM International
    is a member of CrossRef.

    Author
    Title A Potential Metallographic Technique for the Investigation of Pipe Bombings
    Symposium , 0000-00-00
    Committee E30