Volume 40, Issue 5 (September 1995)

    The Influence of William M. Bass III on the Development of American Forensic Anthropology

    CODEN: JFSOAD

      Format Pages Price  
    PDF Version 6 $25   ADD TO CART


    Abstract

    Through his teaching, research and casework over the last 33 years, William M. Bass has become a central figure in the development of the American forensic anthropology. His influence can be measured through the quantity and activity of his students in the field, the number and breadth of his publications relating to the field, his growing casework, his activity and important role in the development of the Physical Anthropology section of the American Academy of Forensic Sciences, and his continual willingness to lecture to interested groups.

    Like many of his contemporaries in physical anthropology. Bass gradually shifted his academic interests toward forensic anthropology throughout his career. This shift is reflected in all areas of his academic life. His contributions have raised professionalism and acceptance of forensic anthropology as an integrated aspect of both forensic science and anthropology.

    Bass's unique style and breadth of his contributions can be traced to his education (University of Virginia, Kentucky, and Pennsylvania) and his mentors (Coon, Krogman, Stewart, Eisley and Roberts).


    Author Information:

    Ubelaker, DH
    Curator and Collections Manager/Physical Anthropology, MRC 112 National Museum of Natural History, Smithsonian Institution, Washington, D.C.

    Hunt, DR
    Curator and Collections Manager/Physical Anthropology, MRC 112 National Museum of Natural History, Smithsonian Institution, Washington, D.C.


    Stock #: JFS15374J

    ISSN: 0022-1198

    DOI: 10.1520/JFS15374J

    ASTM International
    is a member of CrossRef.

    Author
    Title The Influence of William M. Bass III on the Development of American Forensic Anthropology
    Symposium , 0000-00-00
    Committee E30