Identification of Sperm and Non-Sperm Male Cells in Cervicovaginal Smears Using Fluorescence In Situ Hybridization: Applications in Alleged Sexual Assault Cases

    Volume 39, Issue 6 (November 1994)

    ISSN: 0022-1198

    CODEN: JFSOAD

    Page Count: 9


    Collins, KA
    Resident, Bowman Gray School of Medicine of Wake Forest University,

    Geisinger, KR
    Professor and Director of Surgical Pathology and Cytopathology, Bowman Gray School of Medicine of Wake Forest University,

    Pettenati, MJ
    Assistant and Associate Professors respectively, and Directors of the Cytogenetic and Molecular Cytogenetic Laboratory, Section on Medical Genetics, Bowman Gray School of Medicine of Wake Forest University,

    Tap, MP
    Cytotechnologist, Bowman Gray School of Medicine of Wake Forest University,

    Lantz, PE
    Assistant Professor and Forensic Pathologist, Bowman Gray School of Medicine of Wake Forest University,

    Nagesh Rao, P
    Assistant and Associate Professors respectively, and Directors of the Cytogenetic and Molecular Cytogenetic Laboratory, Section on Medical Genetics, Bowman Gray School of Medicine of Wake Forest University,

    Hayworth, R
    Molecular Cytogenetic Technologists, Section on Medical Genetics, Bowman Gray School of Medicine of Wake Forest University,

    Schnell, S
    Molecular Cytogenetic Technologists, Section on Medical Genetics, Bowman Gray School of Medicine of Wake Forest University,

    (Received 18 January 1994; accepted 11 April 1994)

    Abstract

    The identification of spermatozoa or constituents of seminal fluid is critical in the evaluation of alleged sexual assault victims. However, failure to identify sperm and/or elevated levels of acid phosphatase can occur for a variety of reasons. Molecular techniques, such as molecular cytogenetic analysis offers new approaches to improve on the identification of male cells in alleged sexual assault cases.

    Fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) with a Y chromosome specific DNA probe was applied to archival cervicovaginal smears from 41 alleged sexual assault cases to identify Y-bearing (male) cells. FISH identified Y-bearing sperm and non-serm cells in 78% of the cases previously confirmed to have sperm. FISH also identified Y-bearing non-sperm male cells in 39% of the cases in which cytology did not detect spermatozoa; in one of these instances, it also detected sperm. Cervicovaginal acid phosphatase levels, determined at the time of the cervicovaginal smears, were also compared with the presence or absence of Y-positive cells. Application of this technique can detect non-spermatozoic male cells in routine cervicovaginal smears of sexual assault victims.


    Paper ID: JFS13723J

    DOI: 10.1520/JFS13723J

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    Title Identification of Sperm and Non-Sperm Male Cells in Cervicovaginal Smears Using Fluorescence In Situ Hybridization: Applications in Alleged Sexual Assault Cases
    Symposium , 0000-00-00
    Committee E30