Volume 36, Issue 2 (March 1991)

    Document Examinations of Handwriting with a Straightedge or a Writing Guide

    (Received 6 April 1990; accepted 15 May 1990)

    CODEN: JFSOAD

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    Abstract

    Occasionally sighted writers practice “straightedge writing,” sometimes referred to as “blind-man's writing,” in which a straight object is used as a baseline. Many systems are used, and individual characteristics are established especially in the descenders (lower zonc). Most of these writers try to be neat, yet wish to be unique.

    The writing of sighted people differs considerably from that of the functionally blind, who use many types of writing guides. Guides used by the blind are often flexible, yet confine writing to a given space instead of only using a straight line. For example, there are check templates which fit standard checks to keep the writing in certain areas for the visually impaired. The writing of a blind person is normally not as evenly spaced and precisely formed, and the “t” crossing and “i” dots are often missing. Such writing is individualized and identifiable.


    Author Information:

    Morgan, M
    Questioned document examiner, Regional Crime Laboratory, San Antonio, TX

    Zilly, P
    Questioned document examiner, State Patrol Crime Laboratory, Lincoln, NE


    Stock #: JFS13049J

    ISSN: 0022-1198

    DOI: 10.1520/JFS13049J

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    Author
    Title Document Examinations of Handwriting with a Straightedge or a Writing Guide
    Symposium , 0000-00-00
    Committee E30