Volume 28, Issue 3 (July 1983)

    Characteristics of Forensic Science Faculty within Criminal Justice Higher Education Programs

    (Received 20 August 1982; accepted 12 October 1982)

    Published Online: July

    CODEN: JFSOAD

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    Abstract

    In 1980, the Joint Commission on Criminology and Criminal Justice Education and Standards surveyed more than 3600 faculty members from approximately 560 graduate and undergraduate criminal justice and criminology programs in the country. This paper compares the responses of faculty who indicated expertise in the forensic sciences with those of the larger group of criminal justice faculty members. More than 40% of the 61 faculty who specialize in forensic science have backgrounds in law enforcement and are teaching at two-year institutions. Less than 10% of these faculty have crime laboratory work experience. Teaching is clearly the primary activity of these faculty, with a small percentage of their time devoted to research and writing. The forensic science faculty are also notable in that they customarily teach in an adjunct status and do not hold academic appointments that will lead to permanent status with a college or university.


    Author Information:

    Peterson, JL
    Director, Center for Research in Law and Justice, University of Illinois at Chicago, Chicago, IL

    Angelos, SA
    Forensic chemist, Drug Enforcement Administration, North Central Regional Laboratory, Chicago, IL


    Stock #: JFS11549J

    ISSN: 0022-1198

    DOI: 10.1520/JFS11549J

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    Author
    Title Characteristics of Forensic Science Faculty within Criminal Justice Higher Education Programs
    Symposium , 0000-00-00
    Committee E30