Photographic Superimposition in Dental Identification. Is a Picture Worth a Thousand Words?

    Volume 25, Issue 4 (October 1980)

    ISSN: 0022-1198

    CODEN: JFSOAD

    Published Online: 1 October 1980

    Page Count: 7


    Klonaris, NS
    Forensic odontology consultant and physical anthropologist, Central Identification Lab, Honolulu, Hawaii

    Furue, T
    Forensic odontology consultant and physical anthropologist, Central Identification Lab, Honolulu, Hawaii

    (Received 20 December 1979; accepted 14 February 1980)

    Abstract

    This paper reports a controversial case involving the dental identification of the skeletal remains of an Air Force pilot whose F-105D aircraft crashed in North Vietnam. Only a portion of the maxilla less the teeth was recovered and used in the dental comparison and positive identification. A statement was made to the brother of the victim that the dental comparison removed any doubt as to the identification. This was interpreted by the brother as the following: “Without the maxilla there was no positive ID.” The brother was not familiar with dental terminology and anatomy and was disoriented when trying to interpret the odontologieal narrative. The principles of photographic superimposition were used for general information and orientation to clarify the odontological narrative after the internment of the skeletal remains.


    Paper ID: JFS11302J

    DOI: 10.1520/JFS11302J

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    Title Photographic Superimposition in Dental Identification. Is a Picture Worth a Thousand Words?
    Symposium , 0000-00-00
    Committee E30