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    Volume 24, Issue 3 (July 1979)

    Jury Preconceptions and Their Effect on Expert Scientific Testimony

    (Received 17 August 1978; accepted 17 November 1979)

    Published Online: July

    CODEN: JFSOAD

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    Abstract

    When the forensic scientist testifies in court, both he and his testimony are usually evaluated by a group of people that has never seen him before and has little or no scientific background. These people, the jury, are exposed to the forensic scientist for only a relatively short time, during which they are privy to a strictly regulated question-and-answer conversation carried on between the scientist and the attorneys in the case. As a result of this exposure, the jurors must answer several important questions: 1. What did the expert say? 2. What is the significance of the expert's testimony? 3. Is the expert competent? 4. Is the expert honest?


    Author Information:

    Tanton, RL
    Forensic serologist, Palm Beach Sheriff's Crime Lab, West Palm Beach, Fla.


    Stock #: JFS10888J

    ISSN: 0022-1198

    DOI: 10.1520/JFS10888J

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    Author
    Title Jury Preconceptions and Their Effect on Expert Scientific Testimony
    Symposium , 0000-00-00
    Committee E30