Volume 24, Issue 1 (January 1979)

    Identification of Mass Disaster Victims: The Swiss Identification System

    (Received 17 February 1978; accepted 27 April 1978)

    Published Online: January

    CODEN: JFSOAD

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    Abstract

    In eleven airplane crashes between 1963 and 1974 there were 1189 victims [1]. One hundred sixty-seven victims could not be identified, 331 were identified wholly on the basis of dental evidence, and 166 other cases were identified from dental and other evidence (Table 1). With the standard methods of forensic odontology each victim who had to be identified by comparison of postmortem and antemortem dental records required, on the average, three man-hours just for the postmortem oral examination [2]. A complete set of antemortem dental records may take days to reach the identification center, may be incomplete or incorrect, or may not exist at all [3,4]. Thus a quicker and more accurate identification procedure for victims of mass disasters remains a goal of forensic science.


    Author Information:

    Steiner, E
    Department chairman, clinical instructor, and bioengineer, Dental Institute, University of Zurich,

    Mühlemann, HR
    Department chairman, clinical instructor, and bioengineer, Dental Institute, University of Zurich,

    Brandestini, M
    Department chairman, clinical instructor, and bioengineer, Dental Institute, University of Zurich,


    Stock #: JFS10805J

    ISSN: 0022-1198

    DOI: 10.1520/JFS10805J

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    Title Identification of Mass Disaster Victims: The Swiss Identification System
    Symposium , 0000-00-00
    Committee E30