Volume 23, Issue 4 (October 1978)

    Injuries to Cadavers Resulting from Experimental Rear Impact

    (Received 26 August 1977; accepted 2 February 1978)

    Published Online: October

    CODEN: JFSOAD

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    Abstract

    Low-velocity rear-end collisions frequently produce relatively minor damage to vehicles and perplexing injuries to occupants. These collisions are an ever-increasing hazard, especially at intersections, at interchanges, and to occupants of parked or stalled vehicles. In 1976 20% of all motor vehicle accidents were rear-end collisions involving two vehicles, but these accidents constituted only 4% of all motor vehicle fatalities [1]. The neck is the most frequently injured portion of the body, with 10% more cervical injuries reported in females than in males [2,3].


    Author Information:

    Jones, AM
    Associate medical investigator and assistant professor of pathology, Office of the Medical Investigator, School of Medicine, The University of New Mexico, Albuquerque,

    Sweeney, ES
    Post-sophomore student fellow, School of Medicine, The University of New Mexico, Albuquerque,

    Bean, SP
    Project manager and senior engineer, Physical Science Laboratory, New Mexico State University, Las Cruces,


    Stock #: JFS10730J

    ISSN: 0022-1198

    DOI: 10.1520/JFS10730J

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    Author
    Title Injuries to Cadavers Resulting from Experimental Rear Impact
    Symposium , 0000-00-00
    Committee E30