Injuries to Cadavers Resulting from Experimental Rear Impact

    Volume 23, Issue 4 (October 1978)

    ISSN: 0022-1198

    CODEN: JFSOAD

    Published Online: 1 October 1978

    Page Count: 15


    Jones, AM
    Associate medical investigator and assistant professor of pathology, Office of the Medical Investigator, School of Medicine, The University of New Mexico, Albuquerque,

    Sweeney, ES
    Post-sophomore student fellow, School of Medicine, The University of New Mexico, Albuquerque,

    Bean, SP
    Project manager and senior engineer, Physical Science Laboratory, New Mexico State University, Las Cruces,

    (Received 26 August 1977; accepted 2 February 1978)

    Abstract

    Low-velocity rear-end collisions frequently produce relatively minor damage to vehicles and perplexing injuries to occupants. These collisions are an ever-increasing hazard, especially at intersections, at interchanges, and to occupants of parked or stalled vehicles. In 1976 20% of all motor vehicle accidents were rear-end collisions involving two vehicles, but these accidents constituted only 4% of all motor vehicle fatalities [1]. The neck is the most frequently injured portion of the body, with 10% more cervical injuries reported in females than in males [2,3].


    Paper ID: JFS10730J

    DOI: 10.1520/JFS10730J

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    Author
    Title Injuries to Cadavers Resulting from Experimental Rear Impact
    Symposium , 0000-00-00
    Committee E30