Alternatives in Psychiatric Testimony on Dangerousness

    Volume 23, Issue 3 (July 1978)

    ISSN: 0022-1198

    CODEN: JFSOAD

    Published Online: 1 July 1978

    Page Count: 8


    Smith, JT
    Medical officer, Psychiatry, Division of Forensic Programs; and attorney, Office of the Legal Advisor, Saint Elizabeth's Hospital, Washington, D.C.

    English, MJ
    Medical officer, Psychiatry, Division of Forensic Programs; and attorney, Office of the Legal Advisor, Saint Elizabeth's Hospital, Washington, D.C.

    (Received 27 October 1977; accepted 2 December 1977)

    Abstract

    In the District of Columbia, as in many state jurisdictions, psychiatrists are likely to encounter the issue of testifying in a court regarding their “predictions of future dangerousness” in two situations: (a) during the process of involuntary civil commitment or commitment after a finding of not guilty by reason of insanity in a criminal case and (b) upon petition for a conditional or unconditional release after commitment in a criminal case [1ߝ3]. The criteria for civil commitment in the District of Columbia are mental illness and a finding that the mentally ill individual is likely to injure himself or others because of his mental illness [4]. The standard is similar after a finding of not guilty by reason of insanity [5, 6].


    Paper ID: JFS10710J

    DOI: 10.1520/JFS10710J

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    Author
    Title Alternatives in Psychiatric Testimony on Dangerousness
    Symposium , 0000-00-00
    Committee E30