Volume 23, Issue 1 (January 1978)

    Accelerant Detection in Fire Residues

    (Received 25 February 1977; accepted 26 April 1977)

    Published Online: January

    CODEN: JFSOAD

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    Abstract

    In 1975 personnel at the Institute of Forensic Sciences realized that a full range of analytical technics was not being used in the examination of evidence from suspicious fires. Simple steam distillation was followed by infrared spectroscopic examination, but in a distressing number of cases no apparent accelerant was detected. Midkiff and Washington [1] described the use of gas-liquid chromatography (GLC) with headspace sampling, and Cain [2] followed with capillary column GLC. Later Yip and Clair [3] developed a system for identifying trace amounts of petroleum produced from fire debris. As they pointed out, the most common accelerants encountered are naphtha (C5 to C8 hydrocarbons), gasoline (C5 to C12 hydrocarbons), and fuel oils (C8 to C22 hydrocarbons). From work described in these papers, modifications suitable to available instrumentation evolved.


    Author Information:

    Stone, IC
    Chief, Southwestern Institute of Forensic Sciences at Dallas, Dallas, Tex.

    Lomonte, JN
    Supervisor, Regulated Substances Section, and trace evidence analyst, Physical Evidence Section, Southwestern Institute of Forensic Sciences at Dallas, Tex.

    Fletcher, LA
    Supervisor, Regulated Substances Section, and trace evidence analyst, Physical Evidence Section, Southwestern Institute of Forensic Sciences at Dallas, Tex.

    Lowry, WT
    Chief, Southwestern Institute of Forensic Sciences at Dallas, Dallas, Tex.


    Stock #: JFS10655J

    ISSN: 0022-1198

    DOI: 10.1520/JFS10655J

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    Author
    Title Accelerant Detection in Fire Residues
    Symposium , 0000-00-00
    Committee E30