Studies by Crossed Electroimmunodiffusion on the Individuality and Sexual Origin of Bloodstains

    Volume 21, Issue 3 (July 1976)

    ISSN: 0022-1198

    CODEN: JFSOAD

    Published Online: 1 July 1976

    Page Count: 12


    Sweet, GH
    Professor, Department of Biology and graduate student, Department of Administration of Justice, Wichita State University, Wichita, Kans.

    Elvins, JW
    Professor, Department of Biology and graduate student, Department of Administration of Justice, Wichita State University, Wichita, Kans.

    (Received 15 September 1975; accepted 30 October 1975)

    Abstract

    The potential value of serologic reactions to forensic studies has been recognized since 1901 when Uhlenhuth [1] used the precipitin test to distinguish human from animal blood and Landsteiner [2] used agglutination to show ABO antigenic differences among human red blood cells (RBC). However, the successful use of serologic techniques in criminal cases did not occur until 1916 when Lattes [3] devised a simple agglutination test for ABO typing of human bloodstains. The Lattes test, though widely used in the past and improved in various ways [4ߝ9], is no longer the method of choice in most forensic laboratories because positive results depend on preservation of the activity of relatively labile antibodies in the stain.


    Paper ID: JFS10522J

    DOI: 10.1520/JFS10522J

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    Title Studies by Crossed Electroimmunodiffusion on the Individuality and Sexual Origin of Bloodstains
    Symposium , 0000-00-00
    Committee E30