Pyrolysis Mass Spectrometry—A New Forensic Science Technique

    Volume 22, Issue 4 (October 1977)

    ISSN: 0022-1198

    CODEN: JFSOAD

    Published Online: 1 October 1977

    Page Count: 9


    Manura, JJ
    Chief forensic chemist and principal forensic chemist, New Jersey State Police, Forensic Science Bureau, West Trenton, N.J.

    Saferstein, R
    Chief forensic chemist and principal forensic chemist, New Jersey State Police, Forensic Science Bureau, West Trenton, N.J.

    (Received 31 January 1977; accepted 19 April 1977)

    Abstract

    Pyrolysis gas chromatography (PGC) has found wide acceptance in forensic science laboratories as a technique for identifying and comparing many types of synthetic polymeric materials, particulary paints, adhesives, and fibers [1–5]. As a tool for identification, this technique is restricted to assorting polymeric materials into broad classes. Wheals and Noble [4] have demonstrated the ease of identifying thermosetting alkyd finishes, acrylic lacquers, and acrylic enamels by PGC. Stewart [2] has used PGC to distinguish the three types of nonaqueous dispersion acrylic enamels commonly used by American automobile manufacturers, thereby facilitating the identification of a car's make and model from the pyrogram of its paint binder.


    Paper ID: JFS10414J

    DOI: 10.1520/JFS10414J

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    Author
    Title Pyrolysis Mass Spectrometry—A New Forensic Science Technique
    Symposium , 0000-00-00
    Committee E30