Forensic Toxicology of Some Deaths Associated with the Combined Use of Propoxyphene and Acetaminophen (Paracetamol)

    Volume 22, Issue 4 (October 1977)

    ISSN: 0022-1198

    CODEN: JFSOAD

    Published Online: 1 October 1977

    Page Count: 10


    Robinson, AE
    Members of the staff of the Toxicology Section, London,

    Holder, AT
    Members of the staff of the Toxicology Section, London,

    Sattar, H
    Members of the staff of the Toxicology Section, London,

    McDowall, RD
    Members of the staff of the Toxicology Section, London,

    Powell, R
    Members of the staff of the Toxicology Section, London,

    (Received 25 February 1977; accepted 19 April 1977)

    Abstract

    For many years the most commonly encountered mild analgesic in cases of poisoning in the United Kingdom and particularly in London was aspirin. Often aspirin was formulated with phenacetin and codeine and sometimes with caffeine. Chronic use of phenacetin was found to cause renal damage, but, though acetaminophen is a metabolite of phenacetin, there is no evidence that it does harm to the kidney. Acetaminophen is itself a mild analgesic that has gained favor as an alternative to both phenacetin and aspirin since it does not cause gastric ulceration and hemorrhage when taken orally.


    Paper ID: JFS10409J

    DOI: 10.1520/JFS10409J

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    Title Forensic Toxicology of Some Deaths Associated with the Combined Use of Propoxyphene and Acetaminophen (Paracetamol)
    Symposium , 0000-00-00
    Committee E30