Problems Surrounding Release of Persons Found Not Guilty by Reason of Insanity

    Volume 20, Issue 4 (October 1975)

    ISSN: 0022-1198

    CODEN: JFSOAD

    Published Online: 1 October 1975

    Page Count: 7


    Perr, IN
    Professor of psychiatry and of community medicine (legal medicine), Rutgers Medical School, College of Medicine and Dentistry of New Jersey, Piscataway, N.J.

    (Received 13 February 1975; accepted 3 June 1975)

    Abstract

    The concept of not guilty by reason of insanity (NGI) is not simply a philosophical one dealing with courtroom drama [1,2]. Despite the attention paid to trial issues and matters of strategy and testimony, there has been a relative neglect in the study of the practical effects of current practices. The labeling process sets in motion a series of events. Generally, in the United States, a person found not guilty by reason of insanity is hospitalized either in a special state institution for the “criminally insane” or in a designated forensic unit at a state hospital. The handling, disposition, and technicalities of release are extremely varied and complex. The vagaries of release and subsequent antisocial behavior by an NGI patient (hereafter referred to as NGI) have resulted in adverse publicity far out of proportion to the numbers of people or problems involved.


    Paper ID: JFS10324J

    DOI: 10.1520/JFS10324J

    ASTM International
    is a member of CrossRef.

    Author
    Title Problems Surrounding Release of Persons Found Not Guilty by Reason of Insanity
    Symposium , 0000-00-00
    Committee E30