Volume 20, Issue 2 (April 1975)

    Shock Therapy and Psychiatric Malpractice: The Legal Accommodation to a Controversial Treatment

    (Received 12 October 1972; accepted 26 August 1974)

    Published Online: April

    CODEN: JFSOAD

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    Abstract

    Medical malpractice litigation in the United States is of increasing concern to both the medical and legal professions because of the increased frequency of litigation against doctors and the increase in the dollar amount of claims. Malpractice litigation related to shock therapy, however, is of less concern now than in previous years because of the development of neuroleptics (tranquilizers), psychostimulants, and antidepressant drugs which may be used in lieu of shock therapy for treating certain mental disorders [7–11]. The development of succinylcholine dichloride (Anectine®) and ultra-short-acting barbiturates (USAB) such as methohexital sodium (Brevital®), a fast-acting general anesthetic, has also contributed to the decline in shock therapy malpractice litigation because the proper administration of these drugs can substantially reduce the complications associated with shock therapy [12–17].


    Author Information:

    Krouner, LW
    Attorney and counselor at law, Albany, N.Y.


    Stock #: JFS10286J

    ISSN: 0022-1198

    DOI: 10.1520/JFS10286J

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    Author
    Title Shock Therapy and Psychiatric Malpractice: The Legal Accommodation to a Controversial Treatment
    Symposium , 0000-00-00
    Committee E30