Volume 18, Issue 4 (October 1973)

    The Autopen

    (Received 11 December 1972; accepted 1 February 1973)

    Published Online: October

    CODEN: JFSOAD

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    Abstract

    Throughout history the problem of affixing signatures to numerous documents has been solved in many ways. Roman emperors, Spanish kings, and others used a metal stamp to affix their marks to a document. The monarchs of France began the practice of employing secretaries for this purpose. Presidents of the United States have also seen fit to empower amanuensis, stamps, and the “Autopen” to aid them is signing their voluminous work load. It has been stated that Andrew Johnson was the first president to have a facsimile of his signature printed on a document. He also authorized the signing of his signature on land grants, and the use of a rubber stamp signature for commissions and other documents not signed by his secretaries [1].


    Author Information:

    McCarthy, JF
    Document examiners, Crime Laboratory, Florida Department of Law Enforcement, Tallahassee, Fla.

    Winchester, J
    Document examiners, Crime Laboratory, Florida Department of Law Enforcement, Tallahassee, Fla.


    Stock #: JFS10051J

    ISSN: 0022-1198

    DOI: 10.1520/JFS10051J

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    Author
    Title The Autopen
    Symposium , 0000-00-00
    Committee E30